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Reina-Valera 1865 study: word study of la Divinidad


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Hello brethren,

In this word study of the RV1865 is the word “Divinidad” (Godhead). We are going to look into the definition and how it is used in the Castilian Spanish format.

The definition is “naturaleza divina y esencia del ser de Dios“ (divine nature and essence of the being of God) according to el Diccionario de la Real Academia Española (DRAE) which is the English dictionary equivalence to the Webster’s 1828.

The KJV has Godhead all three places with the capital letter G (The Acts 17:29, Romans 1:20 and Colossians 2:9). The RV1865 has Divinidad with the capital letter D ONLY in the book “Los Actos“ and lowercase letter d in Romanos and Colosenses. The reason why is because Reina and Valera are following grammar of the Castilian Spanish language. In the eyes of the most KJV Onliest gringos out there, it is an “error” because it doesn’t follow all three places in capitalization. 

Brethren the answer is quite simple once you study the Castilian language and the context. In Castilian whenever there is a capital letter in a word: it is a title or a name. When there is a lowercase letter, it is a talking about a description. So let’s look into this

Actos 17:29

29 Siendo pues linaje de Dios, no hemos de pensar que la Divinidad sea semejante o a oro, o a plata, o a piedra, o a escultura de artificio, o de imaginación de hombres.

Acts 17:29: 29 Forasmuch then as we are the offspring of God, we ought not to think that the Godhead is like unto gold, or silver, or stone, graven by art and man's device.

So in context it is talking about God the Father and since Dios is capitalized, henceforth, where are talking about his name and title here. 

Ro 1:20: 20 Porque las cosas invisibles de él, entendidas son desde la creación del mundo, por medio de las cosas que son hechas, se ven claramente, es a saber, su eterno poder y divinidad, para que queden sin excusa.

Rom 1:20: 20 For the invisible things of him from the creation of the world are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, even his eternal power and Godhead; so that they are without excuse: 

In context this is talking about Jesus Christ and henceforth, the description as the Creator. The definition of still applies in this verse and since the word él (him) is lowercase as well: this is just syntax, style and grammar that the Castilian is following and that’s why “divinidad” is lowercase.

Col 2:9: 9 Porque en él habita toda la plenitud de la divinidad corporalmente;

Col 2:9: 9 For in him dwelleth all the fullness of the Godhead bodily.

Same thing applies here with syntax, grammar and style in the Castilian. In context it is a description of what the Lord Jesus Christ is... one person having the divine nature and essence of the being of God bodily. 

As brother Philip Newton says in his study videos, “remember definitions, words have meaning.” This brother’s quote applies to the RV1865 as well. You need to study the language and definition in order to understand why Reina and Valera translated “divinidad” in Romans and Colossians. These men were used of Almighty God, these men knew Castilian and other languages and they knew what they were doing.

I hope this study as been a blessing to you. 

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  • 2 months later...
On 9/6/2020 at 4:42 PM, Kíveño said:

el Diccionario de la Real Academia Española (DRAE) which is the English dictionary equivalence to the Webster’s 1828

I would say it's more of an equivalent to the MODERN Webster's dictionary than the 1828. The Royal Spanish Academy has always been a catholic operation since the beginning, and they even operate as an order.
While the Webster's 1828 is praised among KJV believers as based on scripture, in the DRAE, the definitions of all words relating to the bible or "christianity" are always defined from a Catholic point of view, and if that view differs from the Bible, they have no problem with that.

In this case, that meaning of "Divinidad" is good and doesn't seem to be tainted by catholicism. But, certainly, the DRAE ain't no Webster's 1828. :classic_biggrin:

 

 

 

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16 hours ago, radorn said:

I would say it's more of an equivalent to the MODERN Webster's dictionary than the 1828. The Royal Spanish Academy has always been a catholic operation since the beginning, and they even operate as an order.
While the Webster's 1828 is praised among KJV believers as based on scripture, in the DRAE, the definitions of all words relating to the bible or "christianity" are always defined from a Catholic point of view, and if that view differs from the Bible, they have no problem with that.

In this case, that meaning of "Divinidad" is good and doesn't seem to be tainted by catholicism. But, certainly, the DRAE ain't no Webster's 1828. :classic_biggrin:

 

 

 

Yes I know what you mean by that 😄. So far the best etymological dictionaries for Spanish  are DRAE, Definiciona and DeChile. I use all three for my studies but, I tend to use DRAE more since it is short, sweet and to the point. Do you know other reliable Spanish dictionaries out there? Perhaps a better one in Spain?

 

ETIMOLOGIAS.DECHILE.NET

Esta página revela la etimología de más de catorce-mil palabras listadas por orden alfabetico. Además su motor de...

 

 

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17 hours ago, Kíveño said:

Do you know other reliable Spanish dictionaries out there? Perhaps a better one in Spain?

Sadly, I don't. I've looked into it a little, but never too seriously.

I keep stumbling upon this one called "Diccionario de Uso del Español" (DUE) by a woman called María Moliner, but I have no idea whether it is good or not, nor did I ever find an online version that can be checked.

Anyway, WikiPedia has this category for Spanish dictionaries. Should be a good start, I guess.

EDIT: Well, there's this... You need an account and "borrow" the book before you can look anything up.

 

 

Edited by radorn
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